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As far back as 12,000 B.C., humans were cleaning teeth with flint tools. Let’s fast forward a bit to the Middle Ages, a time period generally recognized as occurring between 400 A.D. to 1400 A.D. Here’s a brief sketch of some significant events:
As far back as 12,000 B.C., humans were cleaning teeth with flint tools. Let’s fast forward a bit to the Middle Ages, a time period generally recognized as occurring between 400 A.D. to 1400 A.D. Here’s a brief sketch of some significant events:

About 1300 years ago, a Chinese medical text described the employ of a “silver paste” in treating cavities. This is the first record we have of the use of amalgam fillings.

500 years later, in 1210 A.D., entrepreneurs in France formed a historic guild, calling themselves “barbers”. Yes, they did cut hair, but they were also doctors and dentists. In fact, this guild would become the center of the Middle Ages’ greatest dentistry advances. Over time they formed two main factions: barber-surgeons, who were educated and trained to perform complex surgeries, and lay-barbers, those uneducated professionals who performed routine services such as bleedings and tooth-cleanings. By 1400, French laws started to regulate dental practices; a royal decree warned barbers against performing complex operations without proper training and education.

Believe it or not, it took a few hundred more years for the first book on dentistry to be published in 1530, and it wasn’t in France, it was in Germany. The book was called “The Little Medicinal Book for All Kinds of Diseases and Infirmities of the Teeth” and it was written by Artzney Buchlein.

In 1575, a French barber-surgeon named Ambrose pare, honorably called “The Father of Surgery”, published his Complete Works, providing other “barbers” with the best text on dental and bodily surgeries that had ever been written up to that point in history.

We at Frandsen Dental are grateful for the passion and effort of humanity’s ancestors, without which we would not be practicing dentistry. Thanks to them, we’ve come a long way. To experience the marvels of modern dentistry, you can call Frandsen Dental in Orem, Utah at 801-224-7900 to set up an appointment with Dr. Colton Rich and his expert team. We’re here to serve!

About 1300 years ago, a Chinese medical text described the employ of a “silver paste” in treating cavities. This is the first record we have of the use of amalgam fillings.

500 years later, in 1210 A.D., entrepreneurs in France formed a historic guild, calling themselves “barbers”. Yes, they did cut hair, but they were also doctors and dentists. In fact, this guild would become the center of the Middle Ages’ greatest dentistry advances. Over time they formed two main factions: barber-surgeons, who were educated and trained to perform complex surgeries, and lay-barbers, those uneducated professionals who performed routine services such as bleedings and tooth-cleanings. By 1400, French laws started to regulate dental practices; a royal decree warned barbers against performing complex operations without proper training and education.

Believe it or not, it took a few hundred more years for the first book on dentistry to be published in 1530, and it wasn’t in France, it was in Germany. The book was called “The Little Medicinal Book for All Kinds of Diseases and Infirmities of the Teeth” and it was written by Artzney Buchlein.

In 1575, a French barber-surgeon named Ambrose pare, honorably called “The Father of Surgery”, published his Complete Works, providing other “barbers” with the best text on dental and bodily surgeries that had ever been written up to that point in history.

We at Frandsen Dental are grateful for the passion and effort of humanity’s ancestors, without which we would not be practicing dentistry. Thanks to them, we’ve come a long way. To experience the marvels of modern dentistry, you can call Frandsen Dental in Orem, Utah at 801-224-7900 to set up an appointment with Dr. Colton Rich and his expert team. We’re here to serve!